Three Hair Color Trends To Try This Season

If you've been planning to change your hair color, fall is a great time to do it. "The colors of the season are multi-tonal," according to, celebrity colorist at Sally Hershberger, a in Los Angeles, who has worked as a colorist on the sets of The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Glee. "So you don't have to stick to one shade." Think a more refined version of you get a new look, but it's not super drastic or one-note, and will also require less maintenance. To help any color last, so that you don't blow all of your money on frequent salon visits, Kaeding recommends using a color-protecting shampoo and conditioner, and using an oil like L'Oréal Professionnel Mythic Oil. "It coats the hair with an SPF and protects color from fading," she says.  

If you have blonde hair

Try: honey-toned lowlights

"You'll be seeing more honey blonds this fall, ranging from light-medium honey to dark golden hues," says Kaeding. If you're a lighter blonde, update for the season by adding in light-medium lowlights. For darker blondes, try to incorporate a hint of a medium or dark blonde lowlights, so that you get that overall golden-honey effect. 

If you have: brown or black hair

Try: adding a bit of caramel

To balance any fading leftover from the summer, Kaeding suggests going with a rich brown base color with soft, caramel highlights for depth and warmth (is even trying it!). If you prefer not to go too dark overall, ask your stylist to keep your sun-kissed roots lighter, and then add a slightly darker shade toward the ends of your locks. It's a way to transition from summer to fall without changing your look drastically.

If you have: red hair

try: copper or cinnamon hues

"This season's reds are richer—think deep coppers and cinnamons," says Kaeding. To try out the look, tone down fiery reds in favor of softer, warmer hues. You can get the effect without re-doing the whole head: ask for a copper or a deep cinnamon shade just on the innermost layers of hair. The idea is that the updated strands will peek through the existing color on the top layers, giving you a warmer effect overall.